Friday, May 22, 2020

Obesity Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program Essay

Obesity in Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP) participants is a problem that needs to be addressed through an effective intervention. The problem is that even though SNAP provides resources to food insecure individuals, the food being provided is not nutritious and is thus contributing to the high rates of obesity in SNAP participants. The most effective way to address this issue is through nutrition education for these participants. At least two intervention programs have worked in the past, with a few improvements that could be made. Looking at two different intervention programs and funding options will help determine the most effective methods for relieving this issue. When the benefits and obstacles of each intervention are understood, the best program can be established, funded, and implemented to best serve the population. Using nutrition education methods to alleviate obesity in SNAP participants through SNAP-Ed and WIC Health are the most effective in terms o f the textbook’s theory layout. The first intervention program this paper will review is called SNAP-Education, or SNAP-Ed. Assisting food insecure families through this program provides education on how to eat nutritiously and could decrease obesity rates among SNAP participants. SNAP-Education â€Å"supports evidence-based nutrition education and obesity prevention interventions and projects for persons eligible for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) through complementary directShow MoreRelatedThe Effect Of Nutrition On Children And Its Economic Impact1549 Words   |  7 Pagesnutrition in children and the impact it has on Health Economics. More specifically, this paper will focus on the impact of food insecurities in the United States, effects on future productivity in the workforce, effective nutritional policy, such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and how this particular policy contributes to the long-run health benefit for children of low-income communities. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), nutrition is defined as, â€Å"the intake of foodRead MoreChildren Are The Hope Of The Nation s Future Essay1525 Words   |  7 Pagesfact that their necessities are not wholly provided is the main reason why poverty negatively affects the well-being of the children. In order to address this concern, the government strived to implement anti-poverty programs in an attempt to mend the conflict. However, these programs are insufficient due to the bigger than expected scale of the problem. Through their individual just peace lenses, concerned citizens also participated in the battle with poverty in different ways. This would includeRead MoreFarm Bill Essay1727 Words   |  7 PagesSNAP Back to the Basics The original intent of the food programs developed by USDA were to dispose of surplus farm production created by farm subsidy programs. (Edwards, 2016) Since original implementations of the food programs, farm groups and anti-poverty groups have rallied behind these subsidies, requesting more government support at the expense of the taxpayer for their organizations. These government handouts have created an entitled, â€Å"subsidy-dependent monster† that has hands reaching outRead MoreObesity Is A Prevalent Issue Within Modern Society Essay1033 Words   |  5 PagesObesity is a prevalent issue in modern society; around 90 million citizens are considered to be overweight in the United States alone (Johnson, Hayes, Brown, Hoo, Ethier, 2014). According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (2014), symptoms resulting from obesity, such as diabetes or high cholesterol, are in the top ten leading causes of death in America. These high numbers can be attributed to low ra tes of physical activity along with minimal fruit and vegetable intake (Johnson, HayesRead MoreAn Article About A Local Non Profit Agency Doubling The Value Of Snap ( Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program888 Words   |  4 Pagesagency doubling the value of SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) benefits when used at the local farmers’ market. One dollar of SNAP benefits would allow a participant to receive two dollars’ worth of items from the farmers market. The purpose of the non-profit doubling the value was to make fresh, local, healthy choices available for a reasonable value to SNAP recipients. Week after week as I visited the farmers market and asked how the program was going, the market manager saidRead MoreThe Food Stamp Program And The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program1161 Words   |  5 PagesFormerly known as the Food Stamp Program (FSP), The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the largest federal nutrition-assistan ce program and exists to protect low-income Americans from hunger and its associated consequences by increasing access to food. Approximately 44 million people received SNAP benefits this year as of August of 2016.1 Due to the fact that low-income Americans tend to have problems with obesity and poor diet2,3, it would make sense that there would be interestRead MoreThe Food And Nutrition Service928 Words   |  4 Pagesnutrition can cause health problems such as heart disease, obesity, high blood pressure, and many other diseases. Good nutrition promotes healthy weight, good energy levels, good immune system, and reduced risk of disease that poor nutrition causes. Sadly, not all families can provide their children with the proper nutrition that is vital for their well-being but, fortunately, assistance for these families exist. The nutritional assistance can help provide families with the foods and resources thatRead MoreFood Guide Pyramid And Mypyramid898 Words   |  4 PagesMost importantly, African Americans are disproportionately affected by â€Å"obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease, and it is likely that a host of factors interact in complex, and yet unexplained, ways to contribute to these health disparities† (Abraham et al., 2013). Therefore, it is crucial to engage African American families in healthy eating habits by increasing awareness of MyPlate. Situation Analysis Obesity rates are soaring within the United States, while efforts to changeRead MoreSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program ( Snap ) Formerly Known As The Food Stamp Essay1709 Words   |  7 PagesSupplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) formerly known as the Food Stamp Program was created in 1964 by President Johnson. In order to get rid of the stigma that the name had, a law was passed changing its name to SNAP in late 20008. The purpose of the program is to help low income individuals and families by providing economic benefits to communities. SNAP is considered to be one of the largest program in domestic hunger safety net. Another popular program is the Community Food ProjectsRead MoreThe Government Should Control The American Peoples1386 Words   |  6 Pagescontributes to obesity which results in an increase in a plethora of diseases. The cost of these diseases has a huge economic impact on the country. The government owes it to its citizens to control these costs through diet regulation. It also owes its citizens the opportunity for optimal health. Poor diets can lead to obesity. There are an estimated 300,000 deaths per year that can be attributed to obesity. Tobacco is the only thing that causes more preventable deaths per year than obesity in the United

Thursday, May 7, 2020

The Application Of Competitive Strategy Dynamics Essay

THE APPLICATION OF COMPETITIVE STRATEGY DYNAMICS: A CASE STUDY OF STARBUCKS CORPORATION Abstract Firms that earn persistently higher levels of profit than competitors have a competitive advantage (Grant, 2008; Porter 1985). Michael Porters famous five forces of competitive position model provide a simple perspective for assessing and analyzing the competitive strength of a corporation or business organization. The competitive advantage (CA) model of Porter learns that competitive strategy is all about taking offensive or defensive action to create a defensive action to create a defendable position in an industry in order to cope successfully with competitive forces and generate a superior return on investment. Starbucks is a notable company that can be useful to researchers and industry observers who want to understand the underlying factors for a company to achieve a sustainable competitive strategic position in an ever-saturating industry. Starbucks is an exemplary company that has continued to succeed with a new take on an established product, coffee. On July 21, 2016, Starb ucks corporation reported 3rd quarter 2016 earnings of 0.49 per share. This result is in line with the consensus of the 27 analysts following the company and this exceeded 2015’s 3rd quarter result by 16.67%. Given this background, a case study of Starbucks is presented and analyzed in this writing to determine and evaluate their competitive strategic dynamics. Company Profile The firstShow MoreRelatedAssessment: Googles Business Strategies and Competitive Advantages1703 Words   |  7 Pagesï » ¿Assessment of Googles Business Strategies and Competitive Advantages Introduction The generic strategies that service businesses rely on have significant implications on how effective they are in setting accurate expectations while also consistently delivering an excellent customer experience. The essence of any highly effective, differentiated service strategy is the ability to set and exceed customer expectations with exceptional experiences that take into account the most nuances to significantRead MoreWhat, Historically, Have Been Apples Competitive Advantages?725 Words   |  3 PagesWhat, historically, have been Apples competitive advantages? Apple since its inception was driven by mission to bring easy-to-use computers to market. But during Sculley years (1985-1993), Apple targeted low cost computer and forge an alliance with IBM for OS development on Intel platform, both of which didn’t bear any results. Spindler‘s (‘93-‘96) strategy to expand to international market gave short-term results, but did not help Apple in long term. Amelio (‘96-’97) decided to go back to premiumRead MoreEnterprise Technologies And The Value Chain1376 Words   |  6 Pagesdeliver value to its customers, it is important for said firms to understand how and where value is created and potentially lost. In today’s business environment, implementing traditional value chains are resulting in firms falling behind†¦losing its competitive advantage. Today’s value chains are a blend of both traditional and virtual value chains. Grounded in both value chains is technology. Those firms that adopt emerging enterprise technologies are able to move at a faster pace becoming more efficientRead MoreAuthentic Wine Country Is A Small Enterprise756 Words   |  4 Pagesfaster integration and application of the NetSuite software that will save time. In addition, Authentic Wine Country’s success hinges on the incorporation of CRM in order to stay competitive and create a customer-centric approach (Baltzan, 2013). For a CRM system, Microsoft Dynamics CRM proves the most up-to-date as well as easy to use offering for marketing solutions within a cloud computing CRM software. With the wide range of marketing offerings included in Microsoft Dynamics especially that ofRead MoreNetwork Theory of Internalization and Social Capital in Internalization1000 Words   |  4 Pagesenterprise network achieve a more solid and competitive structure, can access specialized services technology, purchase of inputs, financing and improvement of industrial processes, in addition to enhancing it s competitive progress in terms of processes products and innovation. Michael Porter established a theoretical framework for enterprise application in industries which analyzed the processes and activities that create value in the organization and dynamics with your competition and market. HoweverRead MoreSmart Systems Help To Ensure Reliability And Reduce Security1261 Words   |  6 Pagesbenefits of smart manufacturing systems. Companies can plan their production strategies with data-driven intelligence to schedule the right processes at the right times for achieving the highest production capacity at the lowest possible cost. Decision-Makers Disregard New Manufacturing Techniques at Their Peril Smart homes and consumer-oriented technologies get tremendous press coverage, but consumer IoT applications only account for a few billion devices such as wearable health devices, smartRead MoreCase Study: Amd vs. Intel1549 Words   |  7 PagesSalman 21. Mar. 2010 DBA / MMU AMD vs. INTEL Competitive Challenges The competitive challenges between the top two-chip maker Intel and AMD took a new dimension due to different strategic initiatives taken by both the companies. It is obviously clear that in a condition like competition between these two giants the strategies taken by each can emphasize on the other side of market as it influence the success of the company and the competitive environment of the industry. Clarifying the HyperRead MoreNokias New Strategy, Leadership and Operational Structure in the UK961 Words   |  4 PagesNokia outlines new strategy, introduces new leadership, operational structure London, UK – Nokia today outlined its new strategic direction, including changes in leadership and operational structure to accelerate the company’s speed of execution in a dynamic competitive environment. Major elements of the new strategy include: - Plans for a broad strategic partnership with Microsoft to build a new global mobile ecosystem; Windows Phone would serve as Nokia’s primary smartphone platform. - ARead MoreMarketing Strategy - Microsoft1428 Words   |  6 PagesA critical evaluation of the segmentation, targeting and positioning strategies of Microsoft, as well as an analysis of their strategic position and future market potential and opportunities. Michael Borrelli Rebecca Herd James Hobson Oliver West David Williams Contents 1. Executive Summary 2. Introduction 3. Microsoft’s Windows amp; Windows Live Division, Server and Tools, Online Services Division 4. Microsoft’s Business Division (MBD) 5. Microsoft’s EntertainmentRead MoreEssay on Mkt521 Case Swans696 Words   |  3 Pages The only goal is to increase profits but Mr. Swan’s hit and miss strategies are not working. New Strategy A complete strategy to increase profits needs at least three parts, competitive strategy, focus strategy, and a marketing differentiation strategy. Competitive strategy tries to fit the customer’s perceived position of low price or uniqueness (Konstantopoulos, 2007). Swan’s being the only arena in town must be competitive for the sports and entertainment activity dollars families spend on

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

The Benefits of School Uniforms As A Mandatory Free Essays

In a time when the academic status quo is coming into question throughout America, educators, civic leaders, parents, students, and legislatures are left cycling through a myriad of standardized options to ameliorate the system. From gender-segregated classrooms to the implementation of national standard tests grading both students and teachers, suggestions abound on ways the American public might make its school system a better functioning environment for the socialization and academic study of its children. Among many other suggested and sometimes implemented deviations is the option of school uniforms as a mandatory part of American schools. We will write a custom essay sample on The Benefits of School Uniforms As A Mandatory or any similar topic only for you Order Now Already a part of many school environments, usually private, parochial, or urban, uniforms come with a heady line of debate to the forefront of systematic discussion. Those in support of uniforms in both primary and secondary school environments stand in staunch opposition to those who suggest it might not only detract from the creative development of a child but may ultimately be a waste of time, money, and effort. Many critics of the school uniform movement proclaim that uniforms cannot â€Å"fix† anything about the failings of the American school system, and that it is, in fact, the morals, attitudes, and determination of those in the academic environments that create good schools, not uniforms. Yet, the detractors seem to fall short of reasons to not use school uniforms; those schools that have implemented them as a regimented part of school life support the uniforms as a mechanism to focus children on their work and away from each other, equalize the exceedingly hierarchical playing field of consumer popularity supported by the capitalist marketplace, and undermine the social tensions prevalent in the teenage years that account for so much wasted time, effort, and emotion during the classroom day. Contemporary American culture supports the performance and display of class and status as an important component of society; American schoolchildren replicate these trends, particularly those associated with familiar celebrities and elite brands, overpopulate the classic schoolyard. As a result, a culture of dress code policies and school uniforms have been instituted to counteract the peer competition, ostracism, tensions, and even theft that distract children from their schoolwork. Holloman, Lillian O. Dress-Related Behavioral Problems in the Public School Setting: Prevention and Policy – A Holistic Approach. † The Journal of Negro Education. Vol. 65, No. 2, Educating Children in a Violence Society, Part I. (Summer, 1996. ) p. 267-281. In her review of the uniform policy of urban schools, Holloman reflects on the current violence that infects public schools where there is no system in place to counteract the social problems set in motion by the capitalist-spawned problems of material competition. She addresses not only the problems these play in all schools, particularly in terms of stress, the development of male-female relations, and socialization of American school children, but carries her discussion further to the way these issues play out in lower and working class ethnic groups. She says that while students at all schools must face the issues of material competition represented by clothing in the classroom, it is a situation far more exaggerated for the urban black demographic. She includes the work of other sociologists and academic thinkers in her analysis of the school uniform option for the public schools most frequently attended by blacks. In this environment, she discusses the frighteningly frequent occurrence of violence as a result of material competition between students, with armed assailants stealing one student’s jacket in the middle of a school day in Washington, D. C. While national attempts at school security have limited the level of danger in the schools, it has not limited the violence nor the lasting psychological effects it has on impressionable teens. Because the emotional implications of the violence that frequently ensues as a direct result of the clothes student wear to school in urban black environments, Holloman fully encourages the use of school uniforms, even if they detract from a student’s ability to cultivate a unique sense of self through physical expression. Holloman ways the costs and benefits of the uniform, but ultimately sides with the student’s safety, suggesting that time outside of school will be enough to encourage individuality among students. Likewise, she says, students are at school to learn, and positioning them in the safest environment to do so is the responsibility of all academic communities. Meadmore and Symes, Daphne and Colin. â€Å"Keeping up Appearances: Uniform Policy for School Diversity? † British Journal of Educational Studies. Vol. 45, No. 2. (Jun. , 1997. ) p. 174-186. Meadmore and Symes analyze the policies pertaining to school dress codes that instituted standard uniforms across the whole of Australia. They investigate the devolution and marketization of schools, as well as the growing state control over local practices. While their work is Australia-oriented, they strictly examine the social themes at play internationally that cause teenagers to misuse their freedom of dress in schools to a point that uniforms are a suitable tool to address the need of schools to control what goes on inside their walls. Likewise, Meadmore and Symes take an in-depth look at the transformation of schools over time, since formalized schooling in Australia has its roots in the private/public system of England, where uniforms have been traditionally mandatory. The English system, along with a desire for proper socialization to â€Å"the American way† for immigrant children in the 19th century, was the basis for the American school system’s development, and its lack of uniforms is particularly interesting. Since public schools do not traditionally require uniforms in the halls of America while private schools, modeled more strictly on the elite British schools usually do, the work of Meadmore and Symes is easily extrapolated and integral to the academic discussion of the viability of uniforms in schools. Jacobson, Paul B. â€Å"Personal Expenses of High-School Students. † The School Review. Vol. 52, No. . (Jun. , 1994. ) p. 350-355. Jacobsen, a well-respected University of Chicago academic sociologist, states that ‘secondary education has always been selective. ‘ While this double entendre refers to the past of secondary education as something only afforded to the privileged and now those only adept enough to swim the seas of high school, its significance is important in the modern day American school system. While education still takes place in these schools, he says, it is clear that the education has also left Western Civilization and extended to the malls, shops, and boutiques where clothing becomes a mark of who a student is. It is not about sweaters to stay warm or long skirts, demure in their affiliation with a religious group or cultural standard, but instead about carefully relating brand and styles to characteristics populated by society’s superstars to make a statement about who you are on the inside with each item of clothing. While this is not necessarily inherently bad, it is a powerful beast that changes the face of modern education. Jacobsen denounces free clothing choice at school not because of this reason but because of how it plays out in society; may parents and students cannot afford to play this game with attire in the schoolroom setting, which is already augmented in cost by musical instruments, school supplies, and athletic gear. As all of these aspects of education increase in expense, parents and students should not be forced to keep up to merely stay afloat in the mean world high school society, and as a result, he says, uniforms are a necessary alternative to the status quo. Brunsma, David L. The School Uniform Movement and What it Tells us About American Education. Washington, D. C. : Scarecrow Press, Inc. 2004. Brunsma provides the most thorough and sizeable analysis of the issues in the American school uniform debate. He examines the impetuses, debates, legal issues, and effectiveness of policies where uniforms have been implemented throughout the United States, further embellishing the work with anecdotal components that remind the reader that the issue of uniforms, while seemingly minor, actually has large ramifications on the future of American school systems and the expectations made of American children. His debates analyze both sides of the argument, as well as providing a comprehensive history and case study review. While Brunsma’s conclusion is that uniforms do not make schools better, its intellectual review of the current literature on the matter disengages the reader from his opinion and, ironically, supports the implementation of a uniform code. His position is based on a simplistic desire to remain in a non-commercialized world where Gucci and Yves St. Lauren have not invaded the seventh grade classroom, but his review of case studies reveals that it in fact has. The evidence he presents clearly supports the use of uniforms, as the difference between a Sears-bought turtleneck and one purchased at Saks are far more insignificant than the way materialism plays out throughout an entire wardrobe. His analysis, while contrary to his personal opinion, shows that uniforms boost school climate, morale of students, work to eliminate high levels of competition, and support a focused academic atmosphere. All of these works, in addition to the great bevy available in academic journals, newspapers, and bookshelves, provide a great source of questions from which one can more strictly analyze the issue of school uniforms in the American classroom setting and the questions with which one needs to examine the costs and benefits of their implementation. How to cite The Benefits of School Uniforms As A Mandatory, Papers

The Benefits of School Uniforms As A Mandatory Free Essays

In a time when the academic status quo is coming into question throughout America, educators, civic leaders, parents, students, and legislatures are left cycling through a myriad of standardized options to ameliorate the system. From gender-segregated classrooms to the implementation of national standard tests grading both students and teachers, suggestions abound on ways the American public might make its school system a better functioning environment for the socialization and academic study of its children. Among many other suggested and sometimes implemented deviations is the option of school uniforms as a mandatory part of American schools. We will write a custom essay sample on The Benefits of School Uniforms As A Mandatory or any similar topic only for you Order Now Already a part of many school environments, usually private, parochial, or urban, uniforms come with a heady line of debate to the forefront of systematic discussion. Those in support of uniforms in both primary and secondary school environments stand in staunch opposition to those who suggest it might not only detract from the creative development of a child but may ultimately be a waste of time, money, and effort. Many critics of the school uniform movement proclaim that uniforms cannot â€Å"fix† anything about the failings of the American school system, and that it is, in fact, the morals, attitudes, and determination of those in the academic environments that create good schools, not uniforms. Yet, the detractors seem to fall short of reasons to not use school uniforms; those schools that have implemented them as a regimented part of school life support the uniforms as a mechanism to focus children on their work and away from each other, equalize the exceedingly hierarchical playing field of consumer popularity supported by the capitalist marketplace, and undermine the social tensions prevalent in the teenage years that account for so much wasted time, effort, and emotion during the classroom day. Contemporary American culture supports the performance and display of class and status as an important component of society; American schoolchildren replicate these trends, particularly those associated with familiar celebrities and elite brands, overpopulate the classic schoolyard. As a result, a culture of dress code policies and school uniforms have been instituted to counteract the peer competition, ostracism, tensions, and even theft that distract children from their schoolwork. Holloman, Lillian O. Dress-Related Behavioral Problems in the Public School Setting: Prevention and Policy – A Holistic Approach. † The Journal of Negro Education. Vol. 65, No. 2, Educating Children in a Violence Society, Part I. (Summer, 1996. ) p. 267-281. In her review of the uniform policy of urban schools, Holloman reflects on the current violence that infects public schools where there is no system in place to counteract the social problems set in motion by the capitalist-spawned problems of material competition. She addresses not only the problems these play in all schools, particularly in terms of stress, the development of male-female relations, and socialization of American school children, but carries her discussion further to the way these issues play out in lower and working class ethnic groups. She says that while students at all schools must face the issues of material competition represented by clothing in the classroom, it is a situation far more exaggerated for the urban black demographic. She includes the work of other sociologists and academic thinkers in her analysis of the school uniform option for the public schools most frequently attended by blacks. In this environment, she discusses the frighteningly frequent occurrence of violence as a result of material competition between students, with armed assailants stealing one student’s jacket in the middle of a school day in Washington, D. C. While national attempts at school security have limited the level of danger in the schools, it has not limited the violence nor the lasting psychological effects it has on impressionable teens. Because the emotional implications of the violence that frequently ensues as a direct result of the clothes student wear to school in urban black environments, Holloman fully encourages the use of school uniforms, even if they detract from a student’s ability to cultivate a unique sense of self through physical expression. Holloman ways the costs and benefits of the uniform, but ultimately sides with the student’s safety, suggesting that time outside of school will be enough to encourage individuality among students. Likewise, she says, students are at school to learn, and positioning them in the safest environment to do so is the responsibility of all academic communities. Meadmore and Symes, Daphne and Colin. â€Å"Keeping up Appearances: Uniform Policy for School Diversity? † British Journal of Educational Studies. Vol. 45, No. 2. (Jun. , 1997. ) p. 174-186. Meadmore and Symes analyze the policies pertaining to school dress codes that instituted standard uniforms across the whole of Australia. They investigate the devolution and marketization of schools, as well as the growing state control over local practices. While their work is Australia-oriented, they strictly examine the social themes at play internationally that cause teenagers to misuse their freedom of dress in schools to a point that uniforms are a suitable tool to address the need of schools to control what goes on inside their walls. Likewise, Meadmore and Symes take an in-depth look at the transformation of schools over time, since formalized schooling in Australia has its roots in the private/public system of England, where uniforms have been traditionally mandatory. The English system, along with a desire for proper socialization to â€Å"the American way† for immigrant children in the 19th century, was the basis for the American school system’s development, and its lack of uniforms is particularly interesting. Since public schools do not traditionally require uniforms in the halls of America while private schools, modeled more strictly on the elite British schools usually do, the work of Meadmore and Symes is easily extrapolated and integral to the academic discussion of the viability of uniforms in schools. Jacobson, Paul B. â€Å"Personal Expenses of High-School Students. † The School Review. Vol. 52, No. . (Jun. , 1994. ) p. 350-355. Jacobsen, a well-respected University of Chicago academic sociologist, states that ‘secondary education has always been selective. ‘ While this double entendre refers to the past of secondary education as something only afforded to the privileged and now those only adept enough to swim the seas of high school, its significance is important in the modern day American school system. While education still takes place in these schools, he says, it is clear that the education has also left Western Civilization and extended to the malls, shops, and boutiques where clothing becomes a mark of who a student is. It is not about sweaters to stay warm or long skirts, demure in their affiliation with a religious group or cultural standard, but instead about carefully relating brand and styles to characteristics populated by society’s superstars to make a statement about who you are on the inside with each item of clothing. While this is not necessarily inherently bad, it is a powerful beast that changes the face of modern education. Jacobsen denounces free clothing choice at school not because of this reason but because of how it plays out in society; may parents and students cannot afford to play this game with attire in the schoolroom setting, which is already augmented in cost by musical instruments, school supplies, and athletic gear. As all of these aspects of education increase in expense, parents and students should not be forced to keep up to merely stay afloat in the mean world high school society, and as a result, he says, uniforms are a necessary alternative to the status quo. Brunsma, David L. The School Uniform Movement and What it Tells us About American Education. Washington, D. C. : Scarecrow Press, Inc. 2004. Brunsma provides the most thorough and sizeable analysis of the issues in the American school uniform debate. He examines the impetuses, debates, legal issues, and effectiveness of policies where uniforms have been implemented throughout the United States, further embellishing the work with anecdotal components that remind the reader that the issue of uniforms, while seemingly minor, actually has large ramifications on the future of American school systems and the expectations made of American children. His debates analyze both sides of the argument, as well as providing a comprehensive history and case study review. While Brunsma’s conclusion is that uniforms do not make schools better, its intellectual review of the current literature on the matter disengages the reader from his opinion and, ironically, supports the implementation of a uniform code. His position is based on a simplistic desire to remain in a non-commercialized world where Gucci and Yves St. Lauren have not invaded the seventh grade classroom, but his review of case studies reveals that it in fact has. The evidence he presents clearly supports the use of uniforms, as the difference between a Sears-bought turtleneck and one purchased at Saks are far more insignificant than the way materialism plays out throughout an entire wardrobe. His analysis, while contrary to his personal opinion, shows that uniforms boost school climate, morale of students, work to eliminate high levels of competition, and support a focused academic atmosphere. All of these works, in addition to the great bevy available in academic journals, newspapers, and bookshelves, provide a great source of questions from which one can more strictly analyze the issue of school uniforms in the American classroom setting and the questions with which one needs to examine the costs and benefits of their implementation. How to cite The Benefits of School Uniforms As A Mandatory, Papers

Monday, April 27, 2020

Renaissance and Early Modern Philosophy Essay Sample free essay sample

1. Renaissance-Means metempsychosis. and was a clip in Italy where art and acquisition was revived. Humanism-An rational motion in Renaissance Italy that focused on human potency and accomplishments. Secular-World non religious and were concerned approximately now. which mad up the most portion of Renaissance Italy. Patrons-People who supported creative persons in Renaissance Italy. such as the Church and affluent Merchants. who spent money on art to fancify Italy. Perspective-A manner of art that that shows 3 dimensions of a level surface used my many in Renaissance Italy. Vernacular-A native linguistic communication to Dante who wrote in common alternatively of Latin in Renaissance Italy. 3. In the Renaissance times a Renaissance adult female was supposed to get married a strong adult male. be loyal to her hubby and give birth to merely boys. While a Renaissance adult male. had to be good educated. hold cultural grace. understand assorted humanistic disciplines and scientific disciplines. and of class had to hold been a gentleman. We will write a custom essay sample on Renaissance and Early Modern Philosophy Essay Sample or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page 4. Italy’s metropoliss helped do it the place of birth of the Renaissance because the humanists in Florence Italy wanted to hold a metempsychosis of art and literature. Which cause many creative person and authors to flock to Florence Italy. 5. The attitude of church leaders and the affluent toward the humanistic disciplines was really encouraging and positive because they would pass immense amounts of money for the humanistic disciplines to fancify Italy. They so became frequenters of the humanistic disciplines by financially back uping creative persons. 8. The differences between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance in the attitude toward worldly pleasures the Middle Ages focused chiefly the life after decease in Heaven. However the Renaissance is based on this life and pleasance and success merely in this life. non believing about the hereafter.

Thursday, March 19, 2020

Economic Woes Facing the US †Economics Research Paper (200 Level Course)

Economic Woes Facing the US – Economics Research Paper (200 Level Course) Free Online Research Papers Economic Woes Facing the US Economics Research Paper(200 Level Course) The article talked in depth about economics woes facing the US right now. Bush’s plan seems to be a short term solution and they will further sink into a deficit. The Tax cuts instituted by president bush when he got into office in 2000 were mainly aimed at the few wealthy individuals who used some of the services that got lower taxes. Not all people have estates and dividend receipts. The taxes for such services were lowered and they only benefited a few people. Taxes on investments were lowered even though only a few rich individuals will benefit. The sudden increase in discretionary spending both on military and operations and new healthcare measures for the elderly have further sunk the budget into a deficits. The fact that the economy was experiencing a slow down cutting taxes seemed the obvious solution. But in the long run, lower taxes will just increase the deficits since spending is projected to increase dramatically with the expectations that baby boomers will start retiring. Overall the so-called initiatives instituted by President Bush are and will not help the country in the long run since government spending is rampant, the deficit has increased and government is still expanding instead of shrinking as promised. Research Papers on Economic Woes Facing the US - Economics Research Paper (200 Level Course)Never Been Kicked Out of a Place This NiceThe Effects of Illegal ImmigrationInfluences of Socio-Economic Status of Married MalesAppeasement Policy Towards the Outbreak of World War 2Twilight of the UAWPETSTEL analysis of IndiaAnalysis of Ebay Expanding into AsiaResearch Process Part OneAssess the importance of Nationalism 1815-1850 EuropeOpen Architechture a white paper

Tuesday, March 3, 2020

University of Scranton Admissions Data

University of Scranton Admissions Data Are you interested in attending the University of Scranton? They accept almost three-quarters of all applicants. See more about their admissions requirements. Founded in 1888, the University of Scranton is a well-regarded Jesuit university located in Scranton, Pennsylvania. The University of Scranton has an impressive 11 to 1 student/faculty ratio, and the school has been recognized by U.S. News World Report for its commitment to teaching. At the undergraduate level, both health and business fields are quite popular. The university is committed to service, and each year more the 2,850 students perform 170,000 hours of community service. The University of Scranton has high retention and graduation rates, and an impressive number of students go on to graduate school. On the athletic front, the Scranton Royals compete in the NCAA Division III Landmark Conference. Will you get in? Calculate your chances of getting in with this free tool from Cappex. Admissions Data (2016) University of Scranton Acceptance Rate: 75Â  percentGPA, SAT and ACT Graph for Scranton AdmissionsTest Scores: 25th / 75th PercentileSAT Critical Reading: 510 / 600SAT Math: 520 / 620What these SAT numbers meanSAT comparison for Catholic collegesACT Composite: 23Â  / 28What these ACT numbers meanACT comparison for Catholic colleges Enrollment (2016) Total Enrollment: 5,380Â  (3,867 undergraduates)Gender Breakdown: 41Â  percent Male / 59 percent Female95 percent Full-time Costs (2016-17) Tuition and Fees: $42,162Books: $1,300 (why so much?)Room and Board: $14,264Other Expenses: $1,868Total Cost: $59,594 University of Scranton Financial Aid (2015-16) Percentage of Students Receiving Aid: 96 percentPercentage of Students Receiving Types of AidGrants: 94 percentLoans: 70Â  percentAverage Amount of AidGrants: $23,035Loans: $8,637 Academic Programs Most Popular Majors: Accounting, Biology, Business Administration, Communication Studies, Criminal Justice Studies, Elementary Education, English, Exercise Science, Finance, Human Services, Marketing, Nursing, Political Science, Psychology What major is right for you? Sign up to take the free My Careers and Majors Quiz at Cappex. Graduation and Retention Rates First Year Student Retention (full-time students): 87Â  percent4-Year Graduation Rate: 72 percent6-Year Graduation Rate: 79Â  percent Intercollegiate Athletic Programs Mens Sports: Lacrosse, Swimming, Soccer, Baseball, Basketball, Wrestling, Golf, Tennis, Track and FieldWomens Sports: Basketball, Field Hockey, Softball, Swimming, Tennis, Volleyball, Track and Field If You Like the University of Scranton, You May Also Like These Schools Villanova University: Profile | GPA-SAT-ACT GraphDrexel University: Profile | GPA-SAT-ACT GraphSaint Josephs University: Profile | GPA-SAT-ACT GraphUniversity of Delaware: Profile | GPA-SAT-ACT GraphMarist College: Profile | GPA-SAT-ACT GraphStony Brook University: Profile | GPA-SAT-ACT GraphFairfield University: Profile | GPA-SAT-ACT GraphDuquesne University: Profile | GPA-SAT-ACT GraphBoston College: Profile | GPA-SAT-ACT GraphTemple University: Profile | GPA-SAT-ACT GraphLoyola University Maryland: Profile | GPA-SAT-ACT Graph University of Scranton Mission Statement mission statement from the University of Scranton website The University of Scranton is a Catholic and Jesuit university animated by the spiritual vision and the tradition of excellence characteristic of the Society of Jesus and those who share in its way of proceeding. The University is a community dedicated to the freedom of inquiry and personal development fundamental to the growth in wisdom and integrity of all who share in its life. Data Source: National Center for Educational Statistics